• 68°
franklin county times

Catching up with other news

By Staff
Oct. 14, 2001
As our president has suggested, life in this country must go on. While we no doubt will keep track of the latest news in the war on terrorism, some other items crept under the radar screens of many reporters over the past few weeks.
Today is a time to catch up on one of them.
BIPEC grades
state legislators
Nearly half the Mississippi legislators who performed poorly last year on helping to create jobs and build the economy scored higher in performance marks for 2001, according to the Business and Industry Political Education Committee.
BIPEC has found that lawmakers with scores below a mid-level of 56 do little in their legislative work that helps create jobs. In 2000, 91 of the state's 174 lawmakers scored above 56. The 2001 results showed 129 of them with positive grades.
Graded at the top in BIPEC's "champion" category were Rep. Greg Snowden, R-Meridian, with a score of 78, and Sen. Terry Burton, D-Newton, with a score of 77.
Other positive scores were earned by Sen. Videt Carmichael, D-Meridian, 66; Rep. Charles Young, D-Meridian, 62; Rep. Eric Robinson, R-Quitman, 72; and Rep. Billy Nicholson, D-Little Rock, 64.
The worst grade of all 174 legislators, according to BIPEC, was posted by Rep. Tommy Horne, D-Meridian, 31. Three other area lawmakers scored at negative levels, including Rep. Reecy Dickson, D-Macon, 39; Sen. Sampson Jackson, D-DeKalb, 51; and Sen. Gloria Williamson, D-Philadelphia, 41.
Despite the negative rankings of some local legislators, the overall grades "reflect the greatest single-year improvement in the past 20 years," BIPEC president Dick Wilcox said.
BIPEC's evaluation comes through the collective input of individual members and nearly three dozen trade associations. One test score comes from a subjective assessment of each legislator's actions, in such areas as:
Ease of getting an appointment to discuss business-related issues;
Ability to address a business concern when voting contrary to business;
Willingness to introduce bills and amendments and argue a pro-jobs viewpoint in committee and on the chamber floor.
The second score is a reflection of how often the elected representative responds correctly to expressed and obvious pro-jobs concerns by their floor votes. Key issues include:
Controlling the growth of government and regulation;
Reducing lawsuits;
Business taxes and job growth incentives;
Workers Comp, environmental protection and privatization.
BIPEC seeks to determine a legislator's score over a period of time and the scores help BIPEC members decide which candidate to support at election time. In short, these evaluations translate into campaign contributions or other expressions of support from pro-business people.
BIPEC was founded in 1980 by Mississippi business leaders with the purpose of identifying legislative candidates who have a base of business knowledge. It is non-partisan, not a lobbying group and not a political action committee.
It can "freely research, rate and recommend business-minded individuals who will promote economic growth and Mississippi jobs without worrying about party politics or lobbying for particular issues," according to Wilcox.
Some legislators tend to resent the intrusion of BIPEC's monitoring, but it is one measure of pro-jobs votes.
Back to
the present
Thanks to Mary Stokes of Meridian Community College for calling attention to a fragment of a speech by another U.S. president, Abraham Lincoln, on Dec. 1, 1862. Even today, as is the case with much of Lincoln's writings and oratory, the words have meaning:
Buddy Bynum is editor of The Meridian Star. Call him at 693-1551, ext. 3213, or e-mail him at bbynum@themeridianstar.com.

Galleries

PHOTOS: RHS Musical Theatre presents ‘The Wizard of Oz’

Franklin County

Northwest Regional Library announces audiobooks by mail program

Franklin County

Republican primary run-off election for county commission seats takes place April 16

News

Historic Roxy Theatre celebrates 75th Anniversary with upcoming entertainment

Franklin County

PROGRESS 2024: Veteran Spotlight – Mark Dunbar

Franklin County

Franklin County makes seven drug trafficking arrests

Galleries

Why Knot car show cruises into downtown Russellville

News

Get free weather radio at VFDs

Franklin County

PCHS FBLA hosts Little Miss Dream Girl Pageant

Franklin County

PROGRESS 2024: Veteran Spotlight – Johnnie Pounders

Features

Sam Warf: From Tennessee to the White House and beyond

Franklin County

PROGRESS 2024: Veteran Spotlight – Mousey Brown

News

Russellville First Baptist Church receives historical marker

Franklin County

PROGRESS 2024: Meeting a higher standard – Russellville High School JROTC

News

RCS BOE announces new superintendent  

News

Miss Dream Girl Pageant names winners

Franklin County

First Metro Bank hosts FAME Girls’ Ranch donation drive

News

PCHS holds annual Shelby Grissom Memorial Fashion Show

Franklin County

PROGRESS 2024: VFW Post 5184 – ‘No One Does More For Veterans’

Features

Supporting students’ futures

Features

Red Bay Garden Club discusses amaryllis planting

Franklin County

UA announces local students for fall 2023 President’s, Dean’s, graduation lists

News

School news

Franklin County

PROGRESS 2024: Veteran Spotlight – Troy Oliver

x