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franklin county times

Tragedy stirs the poet within

By Staff
Oct. 7, 2001
Repercussions from the Sept. 11 attacks on America have taken an interesting local turn. Their emotions stirred by the magnitude of destruction and lives suddenly changed, many readers, particularly young readers, are writing poetry, and sending it to their community newspaper for publication.
Some of the work has already made its way into these pages and, today, I am pleased to present in this space two more examples.
First, from Amanda Cody, an 8th grader at Northwest Junior High. A cover letter from her mother, Lisa, accompanied her poem.
Here is the poem by Amanda Cody:
It happened on any of other days.
A tragedy that would change all of our ways.
Into three buildings three planes crashed.
They fell to the ground with a loud bang and a smash.
News got around through the TV wires,
And it spread through the people like a wildfire.
It killed more people than the
population of some cities.
The tears and broken hearts were shared by many.
It got a title called America Under Attack.
The president, George Bush, said "We will fight back."
But through all of the madness,
sadness, and war,
People never stopped to think what Jesus was for.
Put all your trust and faith in the Lord
And you'll soon discover just what His power can be used for.
If someone had witnessed to somebody else,
Would this all have happened, could it have been helped?
It says in Revelation when the End Times are near
There will be war, pain and great fear.
Nobody knows when this day is coming,
But for many this tragedy was a clear warning.
For many the memory will bring back pain.
Visions of people jumping out of
windows like falling drops of rain.
All the friends and family that died that day
Will never be forgotten with each tear that is wiped away.
My advice to you is to pray and nothing else.
Eventually you will see how it has helped.
Some people got tired of hearing about it 24/7,
But no one will forget the day of 9/11.
Next comes a work by Brandi Boyd of Newton, a student at East Central Community College. Here is her poem:
A Voice to Be Heard
When I was young someone once told me "one day you're here, then the next day you're gone."
I never really paid attention because I never thought about things going wrong.
In our lives we live one day to the next as best as we can
Somewhere along the way we've let our nation fall apart, like we just got up and ran.
I saw how we pulled together for a tragedy so I know we can.
It took the lives of so many people, for us to finally make a stand.
Still some haven't realized what we've lost, I don't understand.
We should be ashamed of what we've let this country come to.
I don't want to say this about my home but it's true.
If these words could help make a
difference in one person's life, then we've taken the first step to rebuilding our country.
It starts with a voice to be heard,
No more anger, heartache, bloodshed or tears.
Make it okay to tell your children, it's going to be okay, no more fears.
I ask for your help, not just for me, but for your loved ones and friends.
There are hearts broken and dreams shattered, it's time to put an end.
This is for my country, my baby girl and all the world to see.
I can't do it alone, it can't be just me.
When you go home tonight, tell the people you love how you feel.
One day you're here, the next day you might be gone. That's real.
In memory of those we lost and the country we lost too.
Powerful words from young people in our area, affected, like the rest of us, by tragedy a thousand miles away, yet so near.
Buddy Bynum is editor of The Meridian Star. Call him at 693-1551, ext. 3213, or e-mail him at bbynum@themeridianstar.com.

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